At 8 a.m. inside Holy Trinity High School in Chicago's Wicker Park, 29-year-old John Everette sat down with dozens of teenagers to take the ACT college placement test.

John Everette

Fantasty Football Loss Costs 29-Year-Old Man New ACT Scores

Lisa Fielding
April 14, 2018 - 5:15 pm
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At 8 a.m. inside Holy Trinity High School in Chicago's Wicker Park, 29-year-old John Everette sat down with dozens of teenagers to take the ACT college placement test.

"The kids just kind of looked at me funny and went back to the test. Luckily no one asked me why I was there," said Everette.

He was there because he lost one of his fantasy football leagues this year.

"If you come in last, you have to take the ACT test, but at the time I signed up, I thought the punishment was pretty funny.”

 “I never thought I'd be the loser," he said.

Everette said he knew what he was signing up for, but didn’t take it seriously – after all, he’d never lost at fantasy football before.

“It's great when someone else has to do it, but when it was me, I was really frustrated,” he said. “But I knew I just had to suck it up and do it.”

John Everette, with orange head band, and his fantasy football league.
John Everette

Everette said anyone can register for the test by signing up online and paying a fee.

“So here I am at 8 a.m. on a Saturday morning with a bunch of 16-year-olds trying to go to college." He laughed.

But Everette wasn’t the only adult there.

"When I walked in there was another guy about my age and I asked him: ‘Hey, did you lose a bet?’ And he said: ‘Yeah fantasy football,’ and we both laughed."

The standardized test lasts more than three hours, and covers four areas: English, math, reading and science. Test-takers also can take an optional writing section.

"The process kind of all came back to me, but it was brutal. Not sure how I did."

Everette said he scored a 31 on the ACT when he took the test nearly 15 years ago. His new scores arrive in two to eight weeks, and as part of the punishment, he must publicly post his results.

He’s a little nervous about that.

John Everette
John Everette

"There's a little public humiliation aspect to it. Not only do you have to sit there taking the test for four hours but no matter what your score is, you have to show it off when they come in,” he said.

Everette added that he has a new appreciation for young people and the time it takes to prepare for this.

"Yeah, I took this cold. I wasn't going to spend any time preparing for this," he said. "I appreciated that I had to challenge myself, but it does not make me miss the days of my academic life."

In the end, he says it makes for a good story.

"I'd prefer not to ever have to do it again, but now that it's over, it's kind of a funny story, I don't mind it.”

Next year, he said, he'll keep a little closer eye on his teams.

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